Uspc dating codes

This is what happened to the Blue Seal line of cards.Although, I would say that the mid 2000’s is when kids (the newer magicians and flourishers) really started to hoard cards (I know I did.) This was around the time custom playing cards started to really pick up, and a market was there for it.” The Blue Seal has been a part of USPCC cards for a good 70-80 years. Not a lot of people nowadays care for the feel of cards from the ‘80s and back, so let’s just focus on the last 15 years, starting in the 2000s and the cards of choice being Bikes, Tally’s and ARRCO’s.But the modern day cards are what kids these days are after: the Blue Seal Tally’s or ARRCO’s (U. Let me be clear about this next bit: there have been literally hundreds of thousands of Blue Seal cards made since the year 2000.

Paul, MN (1980's-2001) in 2001, acquired by USPCC a division of Brown & Bigelow/Standard Packaging Corp.

(since 1962 operated as a division of USPC) National Card Co.

based in Indianapolis, IN & New York, NY (1886-1894) in 1894, was merged with USPC American Playing Card Co.

With over a decade of card handling, and having used thousands of decks with dozens of different finishes and stocks, let me try to explain the mystery that is the Blue Seal. How ’bout at the beginning of what might be considered the first Blue Seal, the overall design of which is still used today.

In the 1965, the United States Playing Card Company (USPCC) decided to no longer use tax stamps to seal their cards, but instead used a ‘postage’-looking stamp to seal their decks.

Leave a Reply